Radical #Mycology Announces the Mycelial Network & Unique Course Offering With a #Permculture Influence in #PDX

Radical Mycology - Recomposing LifeRecomposing Life – August 7th-9th – Portland, OR

Recomposing Life

When permaculture curriculum was first developed there were a couple of areas that just didn’t get enough attention.  One of those areas was mycology and how the regenerative and abundantly productive nature of mushrooms factors into ecosystem and human health.  Well, that is changing as the Radical Mycology has stepped up to offer free resources, pay what you can courses and community oriented strategies for culture change.

Since the initial germination of Radical Mycology in 2006, one of the biggest goals of the project has always been to create stronger connections between amateur mycologists, activists, and grassroots bioremediators working to increase the health and resilience of their communities and environment. Over the years, the Radical Mycology Collective–an anchor point in the larger Radical Mycology movement–has strived to achieve this goal through a variety of means. With the creation and release of free media and educational videos, the group has offered simple and accessible methods for cultivating fungi for food, medicine, and the regeneration of damaged landscapes. By organizing three internationally attended Radical Mycology Convergences, the Collective has worked to build a greater sense of community amongst the many isolated pockets of mushroom cultivators and radical ecologists while simultaneously sharing the often inaccessible skills of working with fungi in a unique format. In the fall of 2014, the group went on a 3-month cross continent tour to share their knowledge and skills with over 40 different community groups and organizations. Along the way, the group discovered a strong desire amongst their collaborators and new friends to understand the fungi and integrate their gifts into the common struggle for finding better ways to live sustainably on the earth.

Course topics include:

  • Guiding principles for allying with fungi
  • Fungal biology and ecology
  • Forays in Tryon state park
  • Mushroom and lichen ID for habitat protection and cultivation
  • Low cost mushroom and mycorrhizae cultivation for food, medicine, and remediation
  • Integrating fungi into landscapes
  • The chemistry and treatment of common industrial pollutants
  • Low cost soil and water testing practices
  • Medicinal mushroom processing and intuiting
  • Mycomimicry in social organizing and self care
  • The somatic experience of fungi
  • Mushrooms as sexual beings
  • Anti-oppression work in mycology
  • Evening discussions on dark ecologies and the philosophy of fungi
  • On-site Installations
The setting for Recomposing Life will be Tryon Life Community (TLC) Farm in Portland, OR. TLC is a small farm and community that seeks to provide space for events and organizations that support the advancement of community-based sustainability and social change and the tending of resilient ecosystems. There will be limited camping available at TLC for some participants. Course leaders will attempt to find lodging for the other participants if other options are not available to them.
The cost of this course is donation-based. We suggest $300 for the entire course to cover course workbooks and other logistical costs. However, to best support the growth of a community of radical mycologists we offer this course under the banner of NOTAFLOF (No One’s Turned Away For Lack Of Funds) while still asking that you GAYAABAGS (Give As You Are Able But Always Give Something). This course is a fundraiser for Radical Mycology. Any money left over at the end of the course will be used to support Radical Mycology directly as a volunteer-run project.
As this event can only accommodate a small number of people, we are asking all those that feel called to this course to fill out an application form. From these applications we will choose a range of participants who will represent as demographically and geographically diverse of a group as possible. One’s ability to cover the suggested donation is not a determining factor in our decision making process. We welcome people of all backgrounds and experience levels to apply.

Register for Recomposing Life by clicking here.

Registration for this course closes on June 12th.

Interview with Radical Mycology Co-Founder Peter McCoy #permaculture

New UPDATE:  Peter McCoy will be speaking at the Permaculture Voices Conference alongside Paul Stamets!

Mycology (the study of the fungal kingdom) is a important piece of both ecology and holistic permaculture design.  I’m excited to present a interview with the Co-founder of the Radical Mycology project, Peter McCoy.  Peter played a critical role in creating the fantastic Radical Mycology Zine and is currently working on a crowdfunding campaign (still running) for a comprehensive radical mycology book!

Link to interview:


Unstoppable oil leak in Alberta Tar Sands!

Ah, the beautiful wilds of western Canada. Rivers, mountains, forests… and out-of-control oil leaks that have already spurted thousands of barrels of toxic bitumen into the environment.

This more than even the hard work of activist may end the Keystone XL Pipeline:


From Sara Reardon of The New Scientist:

The leaks were caused by an underground blowout at a tar sand project in north-east Alberta run by Canadian Natural Resources that had been certified safe by government regulators. One of the firm’s scientists has been reported saying that they are mystified as to what went wrong or how to stop the leak. The company hasn’t disclosed how fast the leaks are progressing.

Since May, there have been leaks through surface fissures at four of the firm’s sites in the area, killing wildlife and raising questions about how well the safety of tar sands operations can be assessed. The company extracts bitumen by injecting steam into the tar sands at high pressure to melt the bitumen and push it to the surface.

Chris Severson-Baker of the Pembina Institute in Edmonton, Alberta, estimates that the method, known as cyclic steam stimulation, accounts for about 30 per cent of tar sands extraction. There’s nothing inherently risky about cyclic steam stimulation, he says, making these leaks all the more worrisome. “If there are cases like this, it shows things are not as predictable as we might like,” says Severson-Baker.

In January, Canada’s Energy Resources Conservation Board revealed that some 5700 barrels of bitumen had leaked from well sites run by Canadian Natural Resources four years ago. But investigations by the company and regulator couldn’t determine what had gone wrong. They suggested that the geology of the area was weaker than they had thought and couldn’t contain the pressure from the steam.

The spill could fuel opposition to the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, which would carry oil from this and similar sites. Opponents worry that the pipeline itself has a high risk of leaking, and that increased extraction will exacerbate carbon emissions. US president Barack Obama has said that he will only give the project the green light if it doesn’t add to carbon emissions, and on Saturday he questioned the economic benefits of the pipeline.

#Punk Rock #Permaculture is Back!

Village Building Convergence Olympia, WA on Aug 19th 2012

So many of you have may have noticed that posting on this site has been a bit a sparse lately and this was do to two things.  First, @gaiapunk (AKA me–Evan) went on a 7.5 month journey around the US in a eco-retrofitted RV doing a mobile tour with the Green Living  Project and promoting awesome permaculture and conservation projects from around the world.  Secondly, after I got back from tour to Olympia I ended up snagging a communications job with Sustainable South Sound and also a new business development position with European crowdfunding start up Flattr.   Flattr is amazing in that it makes it easy to reward awesome content across the web, thus allowing for coders, film-makers, writers,  photographer, podcasters, ect; to be paid for the great work they do.  The most basic description is that it is similar to Facebook “like” buttons but with money behind each click.  I’ve been running flattr buttons on this site for a while and without really trying I manage to earn over 60 euro without any advertising most of which I have given back out to other creators.  I’m very happy to be working for such great entities and I still intend to pursue my passion for Permaculture via community projects, some new digital ventures,  and through the cooperative consulting and design firm I founded called GaiaPunk.  This week Olympia celebrates Permaculture during the Olympia Village Building Convergence an event that I’m proud Sustainable South Sound is a co-sponsor of, and you bet I’ll be out there getting dirty and building community.  Well, now that I’m suddenly, and amazingly, a fully employed individual I will actually have more capacity to work on improving this site and working with others on it.  I would like to thank you all for sticking with me through the dry spell, we’re back baby!